Almost Standard?

Before any website can be read by a web browser, there has to be a DOCTYPE in the HTML. A DOCTYPE is nothing more than the line that is shown on the very top line of the coding. This line is read by web browsers to layout the page and determine if the code was written well or not. If the code is written well, they use something called the Standards mode, and if its old, the web browsers will use something known as Quirks mode. In the Quirks mode, the pages are often rendered differently than what it was originally intended to look like according to the bad/old style used. We were told (and its very much obvious) to always use the Standards mode when rendering or writing your DOCTYPE. Just make sure its proper.

But are these two modes the only ones? No. There is also the Almost Standards mode which is rendered exactly the same was as the Standards mode with one little difference. “This mode shows the layout of images inside table cells and how they are handled as they are in Gecko’s “quirks” mode, which is fairly the same with other browsers, such as Internet Explorer. This means that sliced-images-in-tables layouts are less likely to fall apart in Gecko-based browsers based on the rendering engine found in Mozilla 1.0.1 or later when in either “quirks” or “almost standards” mode.”

The DOCTYPEs that will trigger “almost standards” mode are those which contain:

  • The public identifier “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN
  • The public identifier “-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Frameset//EN
  • The public identifier “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN“, with a system identifier
  • The public identifier “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Frameset//EN“, with a system identifier
  • The IBM system DOCTYPE “http://www.ibm.com/data/dtd/v11/ibmxhtml1-transitional.dtd

 

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